MEET Amended Proposals

Please read the below proposals that have been amended based on participants' contributions from the second MEET discussion on 16 December 2021. The proposals not listed below either failed or passed without amendment at the second MEET discussion. Choose if you agree or disagree with each proposal.
Context: Satellites, space technology, data and services have become indispensable for Europeans, for example mobile phones or car navigation. Thistechnology helps to monitor everything from climate change to freight ship manoeuvres. Since 2007 the EU has had a ‘European Space Policy’, that was replaced in April 2021 with the ‘EU Space Programme’. The flagship elements are Galileo/EGNOS and Copernicus. They provide free and open data and services to the benefit of EU citizens, but they also deliver concrete products to public authorities and citizens (e.g. search and rescue, air quality monitoring, support to urban planning, etc.). The European Space Agency, which was founded in 1975, is based in Paris and is responsible for these and other space programmes.
Context: The European Commission has said that “digital technologies are crucial for the EU to become climate neutral”. But they could also account for 14% of global emissions by 2040 if unchecked. The EU will update existing laws and introduce new measures in order to lower such emissions. One such measure is ensuring data centres are climate neutral, energy-efficient, and sustainable by 2030 at the latest.
Context: In March 2021, the European Commission presented a plan for the EU’s digital transformation by 2030 called the Digital Compass, that is based around four points: skills, infrastructure, business and government. On the issue of “secure and sustainable digital infrastructures”, a key goal is to ensure the widespread uptake of 5G.
Context: According to the European Parliamentary Research Service’s Environmental Impacts of 5G and Effects of 5G Wireless Communication on Human Health, the fifth generation of telecommunication networks are operating at frequencies that were not commonly used in previous generations, changing the exposure of wildlife and people to these waves. However, more research is needed to fully understand these implications as we move toward 6G technologies. The first of these 6G products and infrastructures are expected for the end of this decade.
Context: The Digital Services Act (DSA) was proposed in order to further regulate the obligations of digital services and to foster competitiveness in the digital space. The DSA is designed to protect EU consumers and to provide a robust framework for the operation of online platforms. The Digital Markets Act (DMA) is designed to ensure competition in the digital market by regulating ‘gatekeeper platforms’, such as search engines, so that they do not exclude competition – especially from small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the digital economy. The Commission has launched a comprehensive review of EU antitrust, merger and State aid rules (2020-2024) to meet the new challenges with the digital economy.
Context: Disinformation is ‘information which is misleading or false and has been created and spread intentionally for reasons which could include political or economic gain or to cause public harm'. The spread of disinformation can have a range of consequences, such as undermining democratic institutions, polarising debates, and putting the health, security and environment of EU citizens at risk. The EU’s Action Plan Against Disinformation outlines a set of actions aiming to build up capabilities and strengthen cooperation between Member States and EU institutions to proactively address disinformation There is also the European Digital Media Observatory which is a European hub for fact-checkers, academics and other relevant stakeholders to support policymakers. The Digital Markets Act (DMA) is designed to ensure competition in the digital market by regulating ‘gatekeeper platforms’, such as search engines, so that they do not exclude competition – especially from small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the digital economy. The Commission has launched a comprehensive review of EU antitrust, merger and State aid rules (2020-2024) to meet the new challenges with the digital economy.